Global Recruitment Marketing from Munich: Caro Guillen, Transformation Consultant at Intel

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Global Recruitment Marketing from Munich: Caro Guillen, Transformation Consultant at Intel

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Caro Guillen

Transformation Consultant, Talent Acquisition at Intel

Caro Guillen is a Transformation Consultant for Talent Acquisition at Intel. She’s originally from Costa Rica, and she recently moved to Munich, Germany. We’re pleased to have her as one of the roundtable facilitators at the Talent Brand Summit in London this October. Her topic is creativity on a budget, a challenge we have all faced. Each table will be given a unique dollar/euro/pound amount and a specific audience to reach and engage within that budget. Prepare to get creative!

In addition to learning about her start in talent branding, we got her input about tools and tactics and some of her advice for those who are new in the HR marketing and branding field.

How did you find your way to a career in talent branding?

In a nutshell, since I started my professional career, I’ve been working in the field. 

I joined the Intel Staffing team during my second year of university as a student worker. Since then I have been working in multiple areas of the discipline—from creating marketing collateral to developing global frameworks for our peers around the globe on how to implement talent brand strategies. My client focus also shifted over time. It now covers more countries and brings a diverse set of solutions to a diverse set of clients.

 

What projects are you currently working on?

We are constantly working on new ways to generate value in the talent acquisition space.

Delivering top talent experience means you are delivering solutions that are focused on both your internal and external clients and stakeholders. Think candidates, hiring managers, and your employees. One cannot succeed while another one is disregarded. This is our playing field. 

Our day to day combines a lot of external and internal work. Externally, we are understanding what’s new in the industry and defining the best ways to adapt it to our internal reality; internally, we work with our Talent organization on how to adopt changes, bring in new capabilities, frameworks, etc., that enable them to succeed.

A very simplistic example is when we implemented a Candidate Relationship Management system. My focus externally was to understand the capabilities and potential use cases and how they would impact—both positively and negatively—the candidate and recruiter experience. Internally, my focus was to help the teams learn how to work between the CRM and Applicant Tracking System, delivering those new-and-improved experiences to the candidate that the CRM would enable. 

A current project example that I’m working on is designing how we accelerate our sourcing capability leveraging artificial intelligence. Although we don’t envision this technology replacing our team, it presents a new way to do the work. I’m working with a team who is designing what that new way of work will look like, ensuring that automation enhances rather than detracts from the experience of all involved and considering how best to deploy the new capability.

 

Are there any tactics or strategies that work better (or worse) in Germany than in other parts of Europe? 

Because I'm new to Germany (I moved only 5 months ago) and would probably point to my German peers to answer this question, from an external perspective I believe every talent market brings its own set of cultural nuances that can’t be ignored. We like to apply the “Think Globally, Act Locally” mantra. While co-creating a solution with peers around the globe, we have realized that they face some of the same challenges no matter where they are based. However, there are local nuances and differences that need to be taken into consideration and adapted on the solution you are presenting.

Now that I’m physically located in the European Region, I’d say there are three main differences between working with the United States and Latin American countries. First, there’s the differences in the tendencies and purposes of channels of communication—engagement rules, as we call them. Second, is social interactions. And third, is language usage. Using local languages helps the brand feel more authentic.

 

What creative tools do you find indispensable for accomplishing your strategy and running your program?

Aside from the ATS, the CRM, and other technologies the Talent team needs to succeed, on a daily basis I have to say I’m a bit of a creative geek and also a very visual learner so I like to use visuals that help me do better storytelling when bringing people along on projects. I can achieve this better with the help of the Adobe Creative Suite package and my licenses to stock material. Also, because we’re a very globally dispersed team, we find it critical to have the right tools for communication. Our teams use softphones, video conference rooms, and phone bundles with access to everything while on the go; we couldn’t do it any other way.

 

What advice would you give someone who wants to jump into the employer branding/recruitment marketing field?

The Talent space is changing quite rapidly and transforming into new ways of providing true value to organizations. By working in the Recruitment Marketing space, you will be at the forefront of those new skills companies will demand in the future and therefore generating a unique value for the organization.

For us, our tech recruitment marketing experts work every day on attracting top talent that works on products that will be out in the market 5 to 10 years from now. How exciting is that?

Our field combines the best of two worlds: the human factor of HR with the creativeness of marketing. But the glaze on top is being able to fully understand the industry your company is in and the UVP (Unique Value Proposition) your company provides. It’s this capacity that will help you deliver more attractive, creative, and valuable tactics that resonate better with your audiences. After all, the end goal for us in recruitment marketing is that we’re attracting and engaging the talent that our companies require to generate revenue.

Although I may not be that engineer in the lab who designs the really cool technology, I’m on the forefront of what that technology will be by helping to hire the right engineer who will create it.

 

Where is the best place you’ve traveled to and why? 

Every place I’ve traveled to has a very special place in my memory for various reasons. However, now that I live abroad, going home to Costa Rica brings a lot of very unique sensations. It's my green gem; it’s family, lush tropical rain forests, beaches, volcanoes, animals, waterfalls, and a lot of delicious food.



Want to meet Caro and learn from your other employer branding peers in London? Request your ticket to the next Talent Brand Summit today.

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Broadway, Branding & Puppy Feet: Debra Luna, Employer Brand Manager at Paychex

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Broadway, Branding & Puppy Feet: Debra Luna, Employer Brand Manager at Paychex

In this episode of the Talent Brand Podcast, we chat with Summit alumnus Debra Luna, Employer Brand Manager at Paychex, an HR services and technology company.

She’s a “reformed recruiter” who started flexing her creative muscles alongside her recruiting responsibilities. She shares how her boss decided to convert her to recruitment marketing and branding full time, as well as offers advice for people starting out in the recruitment marketing field.

Debra Luna is the Employer Brand Manager. That’s a fancy way of saying she gets to empower employees to share why they’re #PaychexProud. You can hear her as a co-host on “Culture: Unfiltered” and “What’s Your Story” podcasts on the InsidePaychex channel on Podbean. She holds a BFA in Writing, Literature & Publishing from Emerson College in Boston, MA. She lives in Rochester, NY (by way of Long Island), with her husband, two young kids, and her golden retriever, Rigby. She's obsessed with dogs, musical theatre, Judy Blume, and Oxford commas.

And frankly, we’re a bit obsessed with Debra Luna.

You can subscribe to our show wherever you prefer to consume your audio content. Click here to follow our station on SoundCloud.



About Talent Brand Alliance:

We believe that employer branding and talent attraction professionals have a passion for creating a sense of community for employees at their respective companies. We take this passion and apply it to the growing ecosystem of talent branding professionals to empower learning, sharing and networking within recruiting. Join us!

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An Aussie Abroad: Sharing Knowledge from Berlin at #TBSummit

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An Aussie Abroad: Sharing Knowledge from Berlin at #TBSummit

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Ellie Terry

Director of Employee Experience and Global Communications at N26

Ellie Terry is the Director of Employee Experience and Global Communications at N26,  a banking experience for today’s mobile lifestyle. N26 launched in Europe in 2013 and in the U.S. in 2019.  She is an Aussie who lives and works in Berlin and we’re proud to have her as one of the roundtable facilitators at the Talent Brand Summit in London this October.

In addition to learning about her start in talent branding, we got her input about tools and tactics and some of her advice for those who are new in the HR marketing and branding field.

How did you find your way to a career in talent branding?

Oh, I love this question! My career started in marketing. I was managing global brands, products, and communications for some quite well-known international companies.  

After 13 years as a marketer, I naturally moved into functional leadership roles and was far more involved with people operations, talent acquisition, and strategic human resource teams which sparked a real passion for me. You could say I was quite a late bloomer in the HR field. 

I made a strategic career pivot where I moved into the “people side” of the business. I wanted to apply my core skills and experience to areas of the business where people are the most important commodity. 

Talent branding requires the same experience and expertise as consumer and brand marketing. In this role, I’m able to to bring all my experience in brand management, communications, product marketing, and creative to the Talent team. 

Also, because I came from the commercial operation as a leader of a business function, I understand what’s expected from a high-performing human resource team as well as what it means to be a leader in practice and not just theory.

What projects are you currently working on?

We are currently working on overhauling and consolidating the entire Employee Experience journey. There are over 500 touchpoints, and we’re designing it from scratch.

Basically we’re bringing to life the ultimate and best practices in employee experience from “hi” to “bye.” This includes everything from onboarding, workplace, internal communications, people operations, employment brand, and developing our HR tech to employees. It’s a huge feat for my team—an advantageous and wonderfully exciting time for us. I’m encouraging everyone to break the norm and design for growth.

Are there any tactics or strategies that work better in Germany than other parts of Europe? (Or, is there anything that won’t work in Germany that works elsewhere?)

We’re simply global in our approach; there’s nothing exclusively German about what we do.

What tools do you find indispensable for accomplishing your strategy and running your program?

We’re addicted to Slack, Asana, and a touch of WhatsApp for far more lighthearted and informal sharing of things that inspire us or make us laugh. 

We also have stand-ups and random huddles. When our workload increases, and we’re all running out of steam, I often call a stand-up where we can all share, vent, and help each other in more stressful sprints. This encourages a lot of useful collaboration and really reveals the camaraderie between the team. 

My advice is that people acknowledge that it’s not all creative, Instagram photos and team cupcakes. You will need to understand the commercial side of the business, appreciate what is driving the talent market, and also what resonates with candidates and employees.

What advice would you give someone who wants to jump into the employer branding/recruitment marketing field?

I am often approached about this as this field is quite the hot topic now. My advice is that people acknowledge that it's not all creative, Instagram photos and team cupcakes. You will need to understand the commercial side of the business, appreciate what is driving the talent market, and also what resonates with candidates and employees. Strategic and analytical skills are critical! Oh, and you’ll need to be a people person. You’re constantly presenting, talking, and sourcing content. There aren’t a lot of days that my team sits behind their desks for more than a few hours. 

Where is the best place you’ve traveled to and why? 

The Galapagos Islands. It’s a magical spot and completely took my breath away. So did the blue-footed booby bird.  [ Not sure what one looks like? Here you go ]



Want to meet Ellie and learn from your other employer branding peers in London? Request your ticket to the next Talent Brand Summit today.

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Building Brand Love at Talent Brand Summit: Emily Firth, Global Manager of Employer Branding, Booking.com

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Building Brand Love at Talent Brand Summit: Emily Firth, Global Manager of Employer Branding, Booking.com

Emily Firth is a respected talent attraction and employer branding practitioner. She currently leads global employer branding for Booking.com. She lives and works in Amsterdam and will be one of the roundtable facilitators joining us at the Talent Brand Summit - London this October. In addition to learning about her start in talent branding, we got her input about tools and tactics and her advice for those who are new in the field.

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What makes a difference in your employer branding career?

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What makes a difference in your employer branding career?

What have been the key things that have helped you achieve more, build bridges, get that promotion, hit your targets, and build a better mousetrap? For most, it’s a boss who understands personal development. Need help convincing them to send you to an employer branding workshop? This letter could be what you (and your career) need.

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Talent Brand Alliance Board: Warming up in Texas

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Talent Brand Alliance Board: Warming up in Texas

Exciting things are on the horizon for the Talent Brand Alliance! Our board members came together recently to dream about the future, discuss growth strategies, and to share ideas on how to be an even better resource for the talent branding community. Here’s a sneak peak into what’s in store!

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Talent Brand Case: How the Team at SAS Turned #TBSummit Inspiration into Employer Brand Activation

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Talent Brand Case: How the Team at SAS Turned #TBSummit Inspiration into Employer Brand Activation

Company values – check. Employee value proposition – got it. Corporate brand refresh – complete.

“Now, what if we could bring all of these elements together in a strategy to showcase our culture and tell the story of who we are? Wouldn’t that be something.”

That’s the question the Employer Brand and People Communications team at SAS asked when they embarked on pulling together their first, formal employer branding strategy.

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